Rosewood Center for Eating Disorders in Santa Monica, California provides outpatient care for adolescents/teenagers/teens who have eating disorders

What happens when you send your teenager to an outpatient treatment center for an eating disorder (Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders, Santa Monica)

There are many options for treating an eating disorder like anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and associated disorders. Which treatment plan you choose for your child depends mostly on your child's individual situation and your family situation. Not every child will need to attend a treatment center. If you determine that attending a treatment center … Continue reading What happens when you send your teenager to an outpatient treatment center for an eating disorder (Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders, Santa Monica)

When we focus on anorexia as the only eating disorder we fail to recognize that they impact people of all sizes, races and genders

Eating disorders are more than anorexia: eating disorder statistics that every parent should know

When you picture someone who has an eating disorder, you probably think of someone who is dangerously underweight. But, in fact, the majority of eating disorders occur in people of "normal" or "overweight" body sizes. The classic portrayal of a drastically underweight white female who has anorexia represents a very small fraction of eating disorders. … Continue reading Eating disorders are more than anorexia: eating disorder statistics that every parent should know

Body image, muscle dysmorphia and eating disorders in boys and men

The vast majority of eating disorders are diagnosed in females, but this is increasingly being seen as a gender bias. Eating disorders in boys and men are likely vastly under reported, diagnosed and treated. Recent estimates state that 20 million women and 10 million men will suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time … Continue reading Body image, muscle dysmorphia and eating disorders in boys and men

OSFED: When your child has a non-typical eating disorder

The media portrays eating disorders in a pretty narrow view. While most people have heard of anorexia and bulimia, those two clinical diagnoses are actually much less common than Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorders (OSFED). Anorexia Nervosa is diagnosed in 1 in 200 adults, but at least 5% of adults, and up to 10% of … Continue reading OSFED: When your child has a non-typical eating disorder

Don’t blame the victim (or the parents) for eating disorders – their triggers are deeply embedded in today’s society, by Beth Mayer, LICSW

Too often, when a child develops an eating disorder, we blame the victims, the child and the parents, instead of looking at society. I think that eating disorders are much bigger than any individual, and we ignore cultural forces to the detriment of the people whom we are trying to help. Body control is a … Continue reading Don’t blame the victim (or the parents) for eating disorders – their triggers are deeply embedded in today’s society, by Beth Mayer, LICSW

Eating disorders in children and tweens

It may surprise you to notice signs of disordered eating in your child or preteen, but it's actually not unusual and should be treated as soon as possible. Studies have shown that the number of people suffering from eating disorders is increasing, while the minimum age at which professionals are seeing eating disorders is decreasing. Early detection and treatment … Continue reading Eating disorders in children and tweens

Parents, you’re not to blame for your child’s eating disorder, but here is what you should know about it, by Beth Mayer, LICSW

First, parents should know that no eating disorder is “caused” by any single thing. Eating disorders are complex, and genetics, temperament, and environment all play a role, as do frequently co-existing conditions such as anxiety, depression, and OCD. Thus, no parent has the power to single-handedly create or prevent an eating disorder. There are many … Continue reading Parents, you’re not to blame for your child’s eating disorder, but here is what you should know about it, by Beth Mayer, LICSW