dangers of a too nice family

The dangers of a “too-nice” family culture

Your family may appear to be very happy. Everyone sees you as a cohesive and loving family unit. But, believe it or not, families can be “too nice.” Families that are “too nice” tend to raise kids who: Struggle with their individual identity Feel pressure to conform Repress their emotions Find out how to spot a “too nice” family, why …

child angry recovering eating disorder

Getting angry in recovery for an eating disorder

If your child has an eating disorder, it’s very possible that they feel angry while recovering. Most parents do everything they can to support their child, and they do not anticipate the anger that often comes with recovery. Almost all parents have done the absolute best job they possibly can in raising their child to be whole, confident and strong. …

What it feels like to get away with your eating disorder in plain sight

Most people who have eating disorders remain undiagnosed and untreated, often for life. This is partly due to the weight stigma that surrounds eating disorders, which means that only those who become “medically underweight” based on BMI standards are recognized as having eating disorders. While a lot of us who are undiagnosed will find our own way to recovery without …

Learning how to feel feelings again when you have/had an eating disorder

When we have an eating disorder, we typically become disconnected from our feelings. Instead of moving through feelings and processing them naturally, we resist our feelings, seeking numbing behaviors out of a misguided instinct to protect ourselves from the danger of feeling. When our children are in the healing process from an eating disorder, they need new tools to learn …

Allowing our children to feel sad to help them heal from an eating disorder

As parents, we want to protect our children from uncomfortable feelings, especially sadness or, worse, despair. Most of us came into parenting during the time of a glut of Happiness books, speeches, and articles. Scientists explored exactly how we can increase our happiness with daily tasks, based on the assumption that being happier is always better. It sounds really nice …

Hunger Literacy: teaching your child to identify and nourish their real hunger, by Anita Johnston, PhD

Typically, when we get hungry, we assume it’s physical hunger, but when dealing with disordered eating behaviors, we have to become more thoughtful about hunger because non-physical hunger can often be an important signal of an emotional need. It can guide us towards responding to the emotional and spiritual needs that facilitate healing. Most of us weren’t taught to identify …

How to nourish our children without food, calories and rules

Almost every mother’s Facebook feed has at least one article every day about the food we should or should not feed ourselves and our children. But focusing on the food we keep in our pantries is a misdirection of our job description as mothers. The food that goes in our children’s bodies is far less important than the other forms of nourishment we …

Getting comfortable with being uncomfortable: rebuilding the mind-body connection with aromatherapy and a guided meditation from Kimi Marin

Eating disorder recovery is filled with uncomfortable experiences as the mind learns to reconnect with the body. When your child developed his or her eating disorder, the disorder came in as a coping mechanism to help deal with discomfort. Many of us who suffer from disordered eating find that the more we use starvation, binging and purging, the further we drift …