How to pay for your child’s eating disorder treatment

Eating disorders are chronically underfunded, both from a research and a treatment standpoint. Many healthcare providers are ill-equipped to diagnose and treat eating disorders, and many insurance companies will severely limit treatment or deny treatment altogether. This is seriously depressing, especially since we know that eating disorders that are caught and treated early are less … Continue reading How to pay for your child’s eating disorder treatment

Self-esteem, body image, and eating disorders – what parents can do to help

Eating disorders are strongly associated with low self‐esteem and poor body image. [1, 2] Self-esteem and body image must be improved in order to heal fully from an eating disorder because we can't change a behavior until we change the predisposing factors that drive that behavior. [3] If we tell a child that she's beautiful … Continue reading Self-esteem, body image, and eating disorders – what parents can do to help

What parents need to know about diet culture and eating disorder recovery

Diet culture promotes the idea that weight loss is a meaningful, good and healthy pursuit in life. When we recover from an eating disorder, we must work to eradicate the belief that our health and self-worth are based on our weight. This is hard because diet culture is absolutely everywhere. There are a lot of … Continue reading What parents need to know about diet culture and eating disorder recovery

How to feed your child without fear of “bad” food and weight gain

We live in a dangerous time during which parents believe they are responsible for controlling or maintaining their children's weight. Parents believe that if they don't control their children's food intake, their child will become fat, which is considered by many to be a fate worse than death. According to Ellyn Satter, a well-known expert … Continue reading How to feed your child without fear of “bad” food and weight gain

Emotional withdrawal in the parent-child relationship can be a red flag for eating disorders and other dangerous behaviors

The most powerful emotional shield our children utilize when they are suffering is emotional withdrawal. They may withdraw slowly or abruptly, but the overall goal of the withdrawal is to protect themselves from perceived danger in their relationship with us, their parents. Children can withdraw behind many different barriers, including: Physical isolation (e.g. always in … Continue reading Emotional withdrawal in the parent-child relationship can be a red flag for eating disorders and other dangerous behaviors

Helping your child become a “normal eater” after an eating disorder

One of the biggest problems with eating disorders is that they rob us of our intuitive and natural relationship with food. Parents who are helping a child recover from an eating disorder can be incredibly helpful as we gradually go from disordered eating to having a normal relationship with food. In this article we identify … Continue reading Helping your child become a “normal eater” after an eating disorder

No, you may not follow a “clean eating” plan – why parents need to prohibit the clean eating trend at home to prevent eating disorders

So-called clean eating* is very trendy right now, inspiring people of all ages to pursue a “clean” diet. The clean eating movement includes avoiding processed foods and eating raw, unrefined produce. This often becomes a raw vegan diet, and it is raising red flags everywhere for eating disorder specialists who are reporting an alarming trend … Continue reading No, you may not follow a “clean eating” plan – why parents need to prohibit the clean eating trend at home to prevent eating disorders

Our family’s story of our 13-year-old daughter’s recovery from anorexia with Family Based Treatment (FBT)

By Anonymous My daughter had a brain tumor at age 2 that caused morning vomiting through age 6.* She survived due to early intervention that included craniotomies and physical therapy. She was diagnosed with social anxiety at age 6. She refused to drink water at school because she did not want to use the bathroom … Continue reading Our family’s story of our 13-year-old daughter’s recovery from anorexia with Family Based Treatment (FBT)