Do you kind of hate your teenager?

Do you kind of hate your teenager?

Do you kind of hate your teenager? Do you sometimes wonder how it’s possible that the sweet little toddler you loved so much has turned into a monster? Are you out of ideas for how to make things better – or at least not so bad – at home?

The good news is that you don’t have to hate your teenager. The bad news is that it’s going to require significant effort on your part. You may think that they are the one who has a problem. But if you want things to improve, it’s up to you to take action.

Please understand, parents are not to blame for kids’ behavior. Our kids are their own people, with their own temperament, their own experiences, and their own free will. But when parents complain about their children, they have two choices:

  1. Keep complaining and feel hopeless about ever getting along with a difficult teen.
  2. Look inward and see what changes we can make ourselves to improve our experience of the relationship.

When we choose the second path, there is a chance for change, both in ourselves and in our kids.

But remember, this is not coming from blame. It is not meant to suggest that you haven’t tried your very best and given your child everything you could so far. It’s just that if you kind of hate your kid, then what you’ve been doing isn’t working so well for you. Read on if you want to consider one possible way things could get better.

You are not a bad parent, and this isn’t about love

If you kind of hate your teenager, you may feel like a bad parent. You may think that your feelings of dislike for your teenager mean you are unsuited to parenting them. And you may cry out in pain because you love your child so much, and you just can’t figure out what went wrong.

When our kids act out and infuriate us, it’s not because we didn’t love them enough, and it doesn’t mean they don’t love us. But it does mean that your relationship needs help. And if you’re reading this article, then it means that you are motivated to improve it. You’re motivated to translate your love into the sort of behavior that will build a deep and loving relationship with your child. That’s a good place to start!

Remember that we can’t change other people, but often when we change ourselves and our behavior, we change the way people respond to us. This is the key to rebuilding a relationship with a child who drives you crazy. Recognize that you can’t control or fix your child into treating you better. But you can change the way you behave, and you may see some positive results.

4 tips for improving a relationship with your teenager when you sort of hate them

1. Get professional support

This is going to be challenging. You need someone on your side, but not just a cheerleader or someone on whose shoulder you can cry. You need those people, too. But for serious work, you need a professional who can guide you towards a healthier relationship with yourself and your family. A therapist, counselor, coach, or another person will hold you accountable for your part of the problem while gently guiding you towards more productive behavior.

2. Work on your boundaries

A teenager who behaves angrily and hatefully toward their parent is struggling with roles and security. Maybe your boundaries were overly-harsh, and they feel penned in and trapped. Maybe your boundaries were too porous, and they don’t know where you end and where they begin. All of us thrive in relationships that have good boundaries, but a lot of us never learned how to set and hold boundaries with the people we love. Learning to establish appropriate boundaries will improve your relationship.

3. Learn about attachment

All of us have an attachment style. This is based on how we were parented. And while about 56% of adults have a healthy (“secure”) attachment style, the rest have less-secure attachment. Attachment is nobody’s fault. It’s something that happens to us before we have any free will. And even the most loving parents may have less-secure attachment. And even secure parents can raise kids who have a less-secure attachment style. Less-secure attachment can result in a teenager whom you hate. And one of the most important things you can do to rebuild your relationship is to learn about attachment and move towards greater security.

4. Rebuild your relationship

Remember that if you hate your teenager, it means your relationship – that means both of you, and possibly your whole family – needs some relationship repair. Even if it seems like your child is the problem, relationships are, by definition, interconnected. This means that everyone involved plays a role. And the good news is that if you work on yourself and your role, there’s a good chance that your relationships will improve. Perhaps not magically, easily, or quickly. But over time, and with effort, parents can usually rebuild relationships with angry teens.

Bad behavior is a reflection of the relationship

One of the hard lessons we need to learn as parents is that “bad behavior” in our kids is not a result of our child being “bad.” It’s more often a reflection of the state of our relationship.

From a parents’ perspective, it often seems like the child has a problem. Perhaps they are “too stubborn,” or “a jerk.” But a child’s behavior towards their parent is almost always an attempt to communicate.

hate your teenager get help

Unfortunately, a lot of the time our kids’ “communication” seems rude, condescending, and tests our boundaries. But these behaviors are always our kids’ attempt to get our attention and ask for our help.

It makes sense to blame our teens for bad behavior. It also makes sense to feel angry and ashamed when our teens act out. But if we actually want to stop hating our teens, the only possible path forward is to look inward and seek to change our own behavior, which is often the only way to change our family dynamics.

Why teenagers are so difficult

While hormones and maturation tell some of the story of why teens are difficult, they miss a major element: parental attachment. Without a healthy and secure parent-child attachment, teens become increasingly difficult to parent as they age.

How do you know if you and your teenager lack healthy attachment? Well, the most obvious sign is that you don’t like them very much, and they don’t seem to like you, either.

What is attachment?

Attachment theory is a well-established and deeply-researched psychological concept. The idea is that all children develop an attachment style with their parents or primary caregivers. There are four main styles of attachment associated with childhood development:

  1. Secure attachment (~56%): a child who is securely attached feels they can rely on their caregiver to meet their needs. When the child is emotionally dysregulated, they seek their caregiver’s attention and are soothed by their caregiver.
  2. Anxious-ambivalent attachment (~20%): a child who is ambivalent feels insecure about their caregiver. Although they will behave in ways that attract their caregiver’s attention (e.g. whining, yelling, crying, being rude) when emotionally dysregulated, the caregiver is typically unable to soothe the child.
  3. Anxious-avoidant attachment (~23%): a child who has avoidant attachment does not seek their caregiver out when they are upset. When the child is emotionally dysregulated, they tend to go inward and avoid the caregiver and brush off any attempts to draw them out of their shell.
  4. Disorganized attachment (~1%): a child who has disorganized attachment does not rely on their caregiver for any reliable care. When the child is emotionally dysregulated, they may exhibit ambivalent or avoidant attachment patterns, but it is inconsistent, and they are rarely (if ever) soothed by their caregiver.

Many parents who complain that they hate their teenager are facing a child who is not securely attached.

Luckily, parents can usually improve their parent-child attachment. It takes effort and help. But working on yourself may be the best way to stop hating your teenager.

hate your teenager get help

Teenage attachment problems

Insecurely attached teens don’t believe their parents understand who they really are. This means that we lose authority. Because if we don’t know who they are, how can we tell them what to do?

This is why insecurely attached children are harder to parent in every way.

Our requests quickly escalate to demands, punishments, threats, begging and nagging, but it doesn’t seem to make a difference: our teens won’t do what we ask them to do. This is annoying and infuriating. But doubling down on our attempts to control our teens rarely improves the situation. Instead, we need to build our authority by building our attachment.

Emotional immaturity

Less secure people often lag when it comes to emotional maturity. When a parent is less secure, this can cause them to parent their children with less security. And remember, it doesn’t mean a lack of love. Almost all parents love their children and want what’s best for them. But if you have a less secure attachment style, then your child may struggle. Luckily, parents can become more emotionally mature by working with a professional.

Likewise, if your teen is less secure, they will be emotionally immature. You may see this in their behavior. One minute they are a balanced almost-adult. The next minute they are throwing a toddler-level tantrum because you asked them to take out the trash.

This may seem like a problem with the teen. And if your teen is willing to see a professional, they may gain emotional maturity that way. But parents can also help their kids become emotionally mature by building a more secure parent-child relationship.

In fact, parents can make a huge impact on their kids’ security and emotional maturity if they (the parent) attend therapy even if the child never does!

We must build attachment with our teens

Our insecurely attached teenagers are at higher risk of dangerous behaviors like drinking, antisocial behavior, eating disorders, and more. They are also awful to parent. Insecure attachment creates a self-perpetuating doom-loop in which we become further and further apart from each other. We must actively build a more secure attachment with difficult teens. Of course, this is easier said than done.

Difficult teens will tell us they don’t want us “interfering” in their lives. But that doesn’t mean that we should go back to moping in a separate room, feeling sorry for ourselves. Nor should we start thinking our kids don’t love us and need us. They do.

It’s tempting, but it won’t help to blame our teens for being ungrateful brats who don’t appreciate everything we have given them.

Instead, we may improve our experience of our kids if we can build a more secure attachment with them. We cannot force attachment, but we can establish basic systems that will be likely to build parent-child attachment. It will take time, it will be hard, but it will be very worth the effort.

How parents can rebuild a relationship with a teen

1. Be together

Find ways to increase physical proximity. Insist upon time spent physically together in the same room every day. A great way to do this is family meals. If you’re new to this and all you can do is ask everyone to be in the same room on separate devices for an hour each night, let that be your starting point.

Over time, you can find ways to be physically together for longer periods of time to build secure attachment. Plan activities on weekends and vacations to encourage physical proximity.

A parent’s physical touch can be very soothing for most children. But if it’s been a long time since you touched your child, tread very carefully here. See what happens if you gently brush the top of their hand while talking, or lightly bump shoulders while walking.

Pay attention to your child’s feeedback. If they draw away from you when you attempt to touch them, don’t push it or confront them. Never coerce them into physical affection or make them feel bad if they’re not ready for it. Just take it very slowly, and follow their cues while looking for opportunities to connect.

Don’t rush physical touch if it’s currently missing from your relationship, but do make an effort to slowly and consistently see if there are ways you can physically show your affection

2. Do things together

Parents should find ways to connect with their children over shared interests. It’s OK if it seems like you have absolutely nothing in common right now. You can develop new interests or reframe your kids’ interests so that they become more compelling for you.

Start by picking something your child cares about. For example, if your child is passionate about a sport, you could ask them to tell you about it. Let them be the authority and show you their passion and excitement. You don’t have to love the sport yourself, but can you find a way to love your child’s passion for the sport? Start there.

If things go well, plan outings to watch the sport live. Or just plan dates to watch it at home together on TV. The main point is that you are going to “show up” to participate in your child’s interests.

If your child enjoys video games, play together. If you have an animal-lover, volunteer at a shelter together. Listen to your child’s favorite music group. Let them teach you the latest TikTok dance. No, your teen may not want to do this. Yes, you should do it anyway.

The act of doing something together is very powerful attachment bonding. If you can’t participate in their passion, do mundane things together. Walk the dog together, cook together, color together, volunteer together, or go to yoga together. Just find ways to share projects and activities.

3. Talk about feelings

Most of us want to quickly soothe our kids with statements like “you’re OK,” “don’t cry,” and “but I thought you would like this!” Or, if we’re angry “stop that right now!” and “I can’t believe you would do that to me!” This leads kids to shut down their emotional expressions.

To build attachment, parents need to learn how to provide complete emotional acceptance of their children’s emotions. Almost nothing is as important to your teen as feeling heard, understood, and accepted by you.

When your child complains, yells, whines, stonewalls, or otherwise throws an emotional tantrum, acknowledge the feelings and emotions taking place. Let them exist without trying to change them. Work on understanding the breadth and depth of the feelings. Talk about the experience. Don’t give advice right now. Listen more than you speak. Just stay in the moment, with the feelings in real-time. Trust that your teen will get through these feelings safely.

It may be scary, especially in the beginning. Until you build a more secure attachment, your child’s emotions are going to feel overwhelming. Your teenager is going to test your love by acting out. As in: you say you love me, but can you handle all of me? Practice showing your child that you absolutely can and will handle all of their feelings.

Remember that expressed feelings, even horrible ones, are feelings, not facts. Often, once we accept and even welcome our teens’ raw feelings, they begin to trust that we can handle them. This, paradoxically, means that the feelings become less intense over time. In this way, we are providing a critical ballast to our teens as they navigate the rough seas of adolescence.

You don’t have to hate your teenager

It may seem impossible, but you don’t have to hate your teenager. You don’t have to white-knuckle your way through adolescence. More importantly, if you build a more secure attachment, you will find that life is much easier. Read more here: Why is my child emotionally withdrawn from me?


Ginny Jones is the editor of More-Love.org. She writes about parenting, body image, disordered eating, and eating disorders. Ginny is also a Parent Coach who helps parents handle their kids’ food and body issues.


106744

Helpful book: Hold On to Your Kids: Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers, by Gordon Neufeld and Gabor Mate.

Comments 23

  1. Pingback: Self-esteem, body image, and eating disorders - what parents can do to help - More Love

  2. Pingback: New Year's Resolutions for Rebel Parents - More Love

  3. This is all very nice, but how should I *insist* on attaching myself to a 17 year-old boy who is hell-bent on being as disrespectful, disobedient, and hurtful as he can possibly be? Please don’t suggest counseling, he’s in counseling–on the few times he bothers to keep the appointment. (I’ve taken to showing up without him and taking his spot if he doesn’t show because I am completely clueless at this point).

    Mine is not a case of distracted or lazy parenting, but I do have two other children that I need to raise and I’m afraid they are getting the short end of the stick because their older brother has decided his life goal is to be as hateful as he can be to me.

    1. Michelle, emancipate him, and if you can’t, turn him out when he turns 18. Don’t pay for college if he’s not going to take it seriously, either. Just say goodbye, we love you, please come back when you’ve decided to be human, you’ll be welcome, but not when you treat us like this. And let him figure it out.

      If all your kids are busy being monsters, maybe it’s you. But I’ve seen this over and over, where the parents are nice people who try, the other kids are more or less fine, and one kid is just unbearable. It’s not you and you’re not required to be a martyr. Go take care of your other kids.

      1. Post
        Author

        I agree that no parent is required to be a martyr. But often when teens and young adults lash out they are signaling severe emotional distress. What feels hateful to the parent is actually a symptom of pain and suffering, and possibly a mental health diagnosis, which is serious and requires specific treatment and ongoing management. Our sons are at high risk of having undiagnosed, severe mental health conditions. Many of them lack the tools to manage their anger and frustration. In no way is it easy to help a child who is acting out, and I am not making light of it. But I hope that all options are thoroughly explored before choosing to emancipate a child out of our lives.

    2. Post
      Author

      I recognize that this is a challenging situation, and I”m so sorry that you’re going through this. I wonder if your son has a mental health diagnosis. All of these require specific treatment and would explain (though not make easier) the behavior you’re observing. His “hateful” behavior is likely a signal that he is in extreme emotional distress. While it would be great if our kids could calmly come to us and tell us they are struggling, more often they present hateful and antisocial behaviors instead. Just like when our toddlers tantrum, dealing with these behaviors is not easy, and I’m glad to hear that you’re getting some therapy for yourself.

      Of course you are not lazy or distracted. You are doing your absolute best. Parenting teens is hard, and family systems are complicated. I send you so much love as you navigate this challenge in your life.

  4. Pingback: Is the problem with children that parents are too soft? | More-Love.org

  5. Pingback: Why is my child emotionally withdrawn from me? | More-Love.org

  6. Pingback: Why adult kids don't come home for the holidays | More-Love.org

  7. My comment/question is this: What can I do if my husband and I have completely different parenting styles from one another? Our sons are 9 and 11. They both very much have the secure attachment relationship with me but highly disorganized with him. He doesn’t feel his style of parenting is harmful (he’s critical, strict, sarcastic, not empathetic) and I’m nearly polar opposite and have a wonderful and loving, tender relationship with both. He is not open to counseling, nor does he feel his relationship with the kids is is negative…but it is, they talk to me. Obviously our marriage isn’t great but that’s a while ‘nother story. My 11 year old struggles with self confidence (Im positive it comes from their relationship) and now overcompensates and can very unpleasant to be around. Will the positive relationship I maintain with them be enough to keep their heads above water?

    1. Post
      Author

      This is such a good question! First, please know that you are not alone. Most parents deal with some level of struggle about this. The good news is that your kids’ relationship with you sounds pretty secure, and having secure attachment with just one parent makes a huge impact. However, you are right that parental criticism is deeply damaging. If your husband won’t go to counseling then you may want to go to counseling yourself to get some support as you navigate this difficult parenting situation. And you may want to get your kids into counseling so they have another trusted adult to turn to regarding their feelings. Thank you so much for thinking about this on behalf of your kids! You can have a powerful positive impact on their lives!

      1. Thank you for taking the time to answer my question, it’s very much appreciated (and a huge relief). I have done counseling on my own, but the focus was on my marriage and not so much my kids. Unfortunately the cost of counseling has prevented me from continuing. I do wish mental health counseling was more affordable. Thanks again for your articles, they contain so much information and provide me with great tools!

      2. Post
        Author

        You’re welcome! Here are some affordable therapy options – just putting these out there for you. Of course, therapy is not the only option! You’re doing a great job with reading and researching 🙂
        1. Search https://openpathcollective.org/ – they have sliding scale rates ranging from $30-$60
        2. Find a support group or a therapy group (typically $30-$50)
        3. Try an app like https://www.betterhelp.com/ or https://lp.talkspace.com/

        Sending you so much love as you navigate this situation. Thank you for thinking critically about your kids’ health!

  8. Pingback: Try this if your child is driving you crazy during coronavirus | More-Love.org

  9. What exactly do you do to improve the healthy attachment with a teen who repeatedly physically assaults the parent(s)?

    1. Post
      Author

      Hi Sam, I’m so sorry to hear this. I can imagine that it is terrifying to be physically assaulted. My best advice is to seek professional support with your teen. Physical violence is a behavior that really warrants professional evaluation and support. I wish you all the best!

  10. I understand where you are coming from. And I do appreciate your article.
    But the world is messy. Placing all of the responsibility and blame on the parents’ shoulders is hurtful in an imperfect world. Sometimes life happens. Attachment can be damaged and there’s nothing the parent can do no matter how hard they try.
    In my case my husband died suddenly when my son was 12. My son is no longer securely attached. He is angry, hurtful and does not trust. And there’s nothing I or therapy have been able to do about it in the 18 months since.
    I’m sure there are many cases where the parents have given their all, but it’s not enough and yet we still blame ourselves, the parents, always.

    1. Post
      Author

      I’m so sorry for the struggle you are facing. It is incredibly difficult to go through the grieving process as both a wife and a mother at the same time. My heart goes out to you. And I sincerely hope that you and your son can reconnect over time as you both heal, but it makes sense if you are struggling now. I completely agree with you that even parents who have given their all and tried so hard can face relationship and attachment difficulties. In no way is this article meant to put the blame on parents. I’m so sorry that it felt that way for you. I send you so much love and healing as you go through this. xoxo Ginny

  11. I agree that when there is attachment and a relationship, teenagers will be easier and better behaved. However that information is not useful to a parent whose teen has pushed their parent away and does not want to have that relationship nor attachment in this stage of his life. Relationships and attachments work both ways, and a parent can try everything to get the attachment back with no reciprocation. You make it sound like it’s a choice. My son and I were like 2 peas in a pod until he turned 16. It’s been 9 months since he has detached himself from the close relationship we had and has no desire to be close again. I’ve tried my hardest to get even a fraction of that back. It’s not so easy.

    1. Post
      Author

      I’m so sorry to hear that. It’s absolutely not easy to reconnect with a child. I send you so much love during this difficult time and hope things get better.

  12. Pingback: Unlock the best way to parent a difficult child | More-Love.org

  13. Hi. This is the first time i have read any of your work. I find it very insightful. As the mother of two teens, a boy and a girl, with mental health issues as well, I found a lot of the advice on attachment very handy. Thankyou

    1. Post
      Author

Leave a Reply