A mom’s letter to her daughter who called herself fat

Even the most body-positive parent with a strong knowledge of Health at Every Size can feel overwhelmed when their sweet child calls herself fat. We can talk about positive body image all we want, but when negative body thoughts inevitably find their way into our daughter's head, we may feel frozen and ill-equipped to respond. … Continue reading A mom’s letter to her daughter who called herself fat

Three gifts to give your child who has an eating disorder

Giving gifts is a beautiful tradition, and most parents love the opportunity to shower their kids with presents on birthdays and holidays. If your child has an eating disorder, here are a few gift ideas. Reframing eating disorders Eating disorders, like all maladaptive coping mechanisms (including substance abuse, self-harm, and many behavioral addictions such as … Continue reading Three gifts to give your child who has an eating disorder

Getting to yes when you’re fighting with your child who has an eating disorder

Living with a child can sometimes feel like living with a terrorist. And we all know that you shouldn't negotiate with terrorists, right? And when your child has an eating disorder, the negotiations seem bizarre and infuriating. So what's a parent to do? Most of us can see when we're hitting a wall with our … Continue reading Getting to yes when you’re fighting with your child who has an eating disorder

Emotional withdrawal in the parent-child relationship can be a red flag for eating disorders and other dangerous behaviors

The most powerful emotional shield our children utilize when they are suffering is emotional withdrawal. They may withdraw slowly or abruptly, but the overall goal of the withdrawal is to protect themselves from perceived danger in their relationship with us, their parents. Children can withdraw behind many different barriers, including: Physical isolation (e.g. always in … Continue reading Emotional withdrawal in the parent-child relationship can be a red flag for eating disorders and other dangerous behaviors

Afraid, angry, and tired. Parents are at risk of traumatic stress when a child has an eating disorder

Eating disorders are terrifying for parents for many reasons. Not only are they physically and emotionally harmful for the child, but they also carry tremendous stigma and misunderstanding for parents. Parents who have children who have eating disorders may feel angry, stressed, tired, and obsessed with their child's recovery. These are signs of traumatic stress … Continue reading Afraid, angry, and tired. Parents are at risk of traumatic stress when a child has an eating disorder